ConnectingWomen

 

Your Guide to Women's Golf Day

Women's Golf Day is Tuesday June 6th, 2017

More than 500 golf facilities are hosting Women’s Golf Day events and activities nationwide. Women’s Golf Day is a four hour experience between 4 and 8 p.m. in every timezone where women and girls can experience golf for the first time or where current players can play and welcome women who are interested in golf.   

There are two formats for events:

  1. At a golf course...
    • Two hours of Golf – lessons or playing 9-holes – this will include two hours of lessons – one hour on the practice range and one hour with short game (chipping and putting)  OR
    • Two hours of Socializing/Networking – this format includes two hours of socializing, networking and distribution of golf information about instruction, league play plus other ways to get involved in golf.
       
  2. At a retail store...
    • This option includes up to four hours of basic instruction and socializing using retail store simulators and putting greens.  Instruction should include basics like grip, stance and swing and could include contests for driving and putting.

Women’s Golf Day is a collaborative effort by a dedicated team including allied golf association representatives, golf management companies, retailers and support from organizations working together to engage, empower and support women and girls through golf. The events are open to women and men of all ages, skill or interest levels.

Visit WomensGolfDay to find a participating location near you.  Join the global golf movement and post your photos to your favorite social media channel using the #WomensGolfDay hashtag.

 

Gear Up for Women's Golf Day

Women's Golf Day Banner

For a second consecutive year, Women’s Golf Day will be celebrated around the world on Tuesday, June 6, 2017 between 4 and 8 p.m. Women’s Golf Day is a one-day event celebrating women and girls playing golf, while learning skills that last a lifetime.

This one-day event is designed to welcome women and girls to the game of golf in a fun, non-intimidating environment. Golfers will be able to participate in golf instruction or play in a 9-hole scramble. Immediately following golf, attendees will participate in a celebratory gathering to network and make quality connections through golf.

A global event on the same day creates critical mass through a collaborative effort and encourages women of all abilities to participate. Events are scheduled to take place at golf facilities, practice ranges and even golf retail locations. Local EWGA Chapters are encouraged to participate and welcome these new golfers as members of your Chapter.

Register online at WomensGolfDay.com to host an event, be an official ambassador or to find a participating location near you.

On June 6, join in the global golf movement and post your photos to your favorite social media channel using the #WomensGolfDay hashtag.

 

Balancing Etiquette with Pace of Play

Two women teammates compete in a 9-hole scramble

Having served as a tournament official various women’s golf events over the years, I observed instances that could have helped with the overall pace of play.  Most people don’t want to hold up play, but at the same time, they don’t want to play feeling rushed.  When you look at simple etiquette hints we all know, remember it becomes a key to pace of play - “being ready.”

When your group is on the teeing ground, make sure you have your glove, golf ball, tees and your club so you can hit.  Many times the three players stand to the side (or sit in the cart) and don’t get their club from the bag until it’s their turn – rather that doing that while another player is hitting.  As long as you are quiet, you can “get ready” while another player is hitting her shot.

In the fairway, we all know it’s okay to go to our ball and “get ready” while other players are hitting (as long as it’s safe).  This means when you ride a cart, it’s okay to walk over to your ball rather than waiting to drive to it or watching your playing partners go through their pre-shot routine and hit. 

On the putting green, good etiquette takes place when the first person to hole a putt is the player to put the flagstick back in the hole.  You can walk over to the flagstick and pick it up while player two and three are putting.  You should be holding the flagstick when player four hit the putt, so when the putt is holed, all you need to do is replace the flagstick.  The other two or three players can move toward the edge of the green so when all players have putted, you can quickly exit the green.

This may not seem like much, but it saves 30 seconds to a minute per hole – and that means you finish your round nine to 18 minutes quicker.  Now you’ve just saved time on the course without feeling rushed and will have more time to enjoy with your golf group in the clubhouse. 

 

Play Better in Competition

An EWGA Member escapes the bunker during the Ft. Lauderdale Chapter Championship

Whether you are gearing up for your Chapter championship, the upcoming District Championship or the club championship, here are some important things to keep in mind as your prepare for competition to help you play better:

  • Play a practice round if possible, especially if it’s a new course for you.  You will get a feel for any trouble on the course, can check out hazard locations and determine clubs for yardages on the par 3’s.  Be sure to take notes on a spare scorecard – and make sure the notes are in your golf bag on the day(s) of competition.
  • Practice with your driver and putter.  It’s great to have confidence going into a competition and the best way to maintain your confidence is to practice and feel comfortable with your driver and short game.  You are likely to use the driver 12-14 times in a round so feeling good about your tee shot is important.  Likewise, if you two putt every green, you use your putter for 36 (plus or minus) shots of your score.  Confidence in your putter is a must.
  • Plan your arrival time for the day of competition.  Plan to be on the first tee 10-minutes prior to your tee time.   Now work your schedule back from that tee time – allow 30-45 minutes for warm-up, allow 10-15 minutes to check-in, then allow travel time to the course (take traffic into consideration) and finally, allow time to eat prior to leaving for the course.
  • Use warm-up time well.  The warm-up time at the practice facility is just that – to help you warm-up.  This is not the time to try something new with your swing, grip, stance, etc.  Many players will warm-up with four or five clubs and only hit 5-10 balls with each club.  Divide your practice balls into four or five piles – using one pile per club.  Begin with a wedge or your shortest iron to loosen up, then hit some mid or long irons, some hybrids or fairway woods then finish with the driver.  Some golfers like to end the warm-up session hitting the clubs they might use on the first hole (i.e. driver, 7 iron, wedge, etc.)  Be sure to end with a good shot…this will help you take great confidence to the first tee.
  • Short game warm-up.  On the practice putting green, begin by trying to make five to ten 3 foot putts.  This will help build your confidence with making putts from the three-foot distance once you are on the course.  You may hit a few lag putts (20 to 30 feet) to get a feel for the speed on the greens – but remember some practice greens do not putt like the actual greens on the course.  You may also hit some pitch shots and/or bunker shots, if a pitching green is available.  (Some courses do not allow golfers to pitch/chip to a practice putting green – so watch for any signs that indicate no chipping, etc.)
  • Nerves and the pre-shot routine.  It’s natural to be nervous on the first tee or even during the first few holes of a tournament.  Relax by taking deep breaths and concentrating on your pre-shot routine.  Keeping things the same with your swing and pre-shot routine will help you be calm and settle into your round.  Don’t let a pre-shot routine slow your round down – be ready when it’s your turn and play “ready golf,” if available.
  • Eat well and stay hydrated.  Be sure to start your round properly fueled – eat a good meal (don’t skip breakfast or lunch).  Maintain your blood sugar by eating simple carbs, small snacks like nuts, fruit or other healthful snacks.  Avoid complex carbs and sugar snacks.  A general rule is to drink 16 oz. of water per hour and to begin by drinking water before playing.  Avoid alcohol, soda, sports drinks and fruit juices.
  • It’s just a game.  Regardless of how you play or what score may be, remember it’s just a game.  Like everyone else, you want to get the ball in the hole in the fewest number of strokes.  Some days this is easy - other days golf is hard work.  While we all want to play our best, it is a game and days, weeks and months later, no one will remember your score.  Play golf to have fun and you will continue to love this great game – regardless of the outcome!

 

Take Advantage of USGA PLAY9™ Days

Play9 logo and USGA logo

For the fourth year in a row, the USGA is sponsoring and promoting PLAY9 Days across the United States.  This year, however, rather than focusing on a specific day, the USGA has designated the ninth day of each month as PLAY9 Day throughout the golf season.  (May 9, June 9, July 9, August 9, September 9 and October 9).

Launched in 2014, the USGA encourages golfers of all ages and abilities to take time to play 9 holes.  While many non-golfers state time and money as reasons they don’t play golf, this campaign is designed to encourage people to spend two hours on the golf course playing, rather than not playing at all.

New for 2017, all clubs are encouraged to support and promote PLAY9 days through the primary golf season between May and October.  Check out the USGA Toolkit for suggested PLAY9 activities and social media copy and images.

EWGA Foundation Board Member Jon Last from the Sports & Leisure Research Group shares a report with the USGA that states 60 percent of golfers perceive that 9-hole rounds are a great way to introduce non-golfers to the game.  It’s a great way to experience the game, without consuming large amounts of time to play or when time does not allow for an 18-hole round.

Some benefits of playing 9-holes include:

  • Less time commitment to play 9-holes than playing 18 holes
  • It helps new golfers learn the game’s fundamentals, Rules and etiquette in a less intimidating manner
  • Golfers may post nine-hole scores for handicap purposes
  • Nine-hole rounds may be more cost-effective than an 18-hole round

More than 30 percent of the public courses in the United States are nine-hole golf facilities and 90 percent of 18-hole public facilities offer rates to play 9-holes.  Building on the success from the first three years, the USGA hopes to increase awareness and have more facilities and golfers participate throughout the summer and fall months this year.  Golfers are encouraged to share their experiences on social media and post photos using the hashtag #PLAY9Golf.    

USGA Executive Director Mike Davis says, “What we love about PLAY9 is the opportunity to welcome more people – both recreational golfers and non-golfers alike – to enjoy the great game of golf.”

 
 
 
 
 
 

Meet EWGA CEO Jane Geddes

Newly appointed CEO Jane Geddes and her family

We are thrilled to have LPGA major champion and golf executive Jane Geddes join EWGA as our CEO. Jane is a 14-time winner worldwide, including two majors at the 1986 U.S. Women’s Open and the 1987 LPGA Championship. Following a successful career on the LPGA Tour, Jane earned a law degree from Stetson University, worked at LPGA headquarters, the WWE and most recently as the executive director with the International Association of Golf Administrators.

Let’s tour a quick 18 holes (questions) to meet our CEO, Jane Geddes.

 

 

  1. How did you get started in golf?

    My family moved to South Carolina from Long Island, New York when I was 16 and I was a bit unhappy with the move. I played a lot of other sports, but never golf. My mother saw an article in the Charleston newspaper talking about Beth Daniel winning her second U.S. Amateur and her teacher, Derek Hardy. My mom thought that maybe I would like to take golf lessons…my response to her was, “NO, I hate golf!” Needless to say, she ignored me, scheduled the lesson with Derek and the rest is history!

  2. When did you know golf would be your profession?

    I HOPED it would be my profession after my junior year in college at Florida State. Everyone thought I was crazy, except for my parents who always supported my decisions….thank goodness!

  3. What is your best memory from your years on the LPGA Tour?

    Winning the U.S. Open and LPGA Championship are my two best golf memories, but my best memory of the Tour will always be the friendships I made through the years. The women I played golf with were, and remain in my life, as family.

  4. What is your favorite golf club in your bag?

    My driver.

  5. Who are/were your role models/mentors?

    In golf - Beth Daniel was my role model and probably somewhat of a mentor early on especially since it was due to her that I even contemplated playing golf.

    At work – Mike Whan (LPGA Commissioner), Zayra Calderon (former Pres. and CEO of the Duramed Futures Tour), Libba Galloway(former LPGA General Counsel) and Carolyn Bivens (former LPGA Commissioner) who gave me my first job at the LPGA.

  6. What drives you or motivates you?

    I like a challenge….in golf it was succeeding on the LPGA Tour because no one thought I could. Outside of golf, it’s taking on challenges that require pulling people together to make a difference.

  7. Are there any unique experiences you’ve had that helped make you the leader you are now?

    My life has been one giant unique experience. I played on Tour for 20 years, left to finish school and go on to Law School, worked on the corporate side of golf and then moved on to work at the WWE…yes, World Wrestling Entertainment. I think my unique experiences in golf and the corporate world have provided amazing opportunities to learn to lead in a variety of different capacities.

  8. How can we continue to grow women’s golf?

    It has always been about awareness of opportunities. At the LPGA, it’s about awareness of the Tour, its players, etc. Outside the Tour, it’s about getting women interested in the game on THEIR terms. Women access the game in different ways than what we are used to with men. We must acknowledge those differences and create awareness around access to those opportunities.

  9. What can EWGA members do to impact golf locally?

    EWGA can impact golf locally by spreading the word about access to the game through the EWGA. More to come on that soon!!

  10. What advice would you offer for women in business, when it comes to golf?

    Doesn’t matter how you play…learn the rules of etiquette first, take lessons so you get the fundamentals, know how to “talk the game” on a basic level while on the course and know that you are most likely just as good as your male colleagues…the only difference is that they won’t admit it!

  11. Who is in your dream foursome? (living or not)

    I have played with so many great people in the world that I am not sure I have a dream foursome. If I could turn back time, however, my dream foursome would include my Mom, Dad and my wife Gigi somewhere out on the Monterey peninsula.

  12. What is your favorite food?

    Skirt steak with Chimichurri sauce.

  13. Where is your favorite place to vacation?

    For places I have been lately, it the BVIs on a boat. Otherwise, I like going places with my kids where they can have an amazing educational experience.

  14. Do you have any pets in your family?

    We are first time cat owners….and I am not going to justify it by saying that my cat is just like a dog. Our cat is a cat….an awesome cat but a cat, nonetheless!

  15. Your spouse is a former professional tennis player and two time Olympic gold medalist. Do you play tennis and if so, is it competitive or for fun?

    Yes, I do play tennis….for fun and competitively. I played tennis when I was in my teens (before playing golf) and took it up again a couple years ago. I play to a 4.0 level which in golf would be like a middle-teen handicap. I play in USTA leagues on the competitive side and participate Gigi’s teaching clinics.

  16. What is your best memory or funny story you can share about being the mother of twins?

    Every day is a new memory…sounds cliché but true. As far as a funny memory, it’s when they were infants and we had to keep a notebook on when we fed them because, even though it seems unlikely, they were not always hungry at the same time or ate the same amount so we had to keep track of each. Gigi was meticulous at keeping the records and I was, well….not as meticulous with my exact amounts of formula, etc. We called her the “Formula-Nazi” for that period of time! We still have the notebook….we always have a story that we reminisce about when we open it.

  17. You are preparing for an upcoming Legends Tour event in Wisconsin – what do you focus on as you prepare for competition? (Sandra Palmer once said she starts practicing five days before the event!)

    I don’t practice at all…my theory is that if I am not playing all the time, I operate on the law of diminishing returns. My best days are my first few and it’s downhill from there! I was never a big practicer…just ask my friends. So, this should surprise no one who knows me!

  18. What are you most looking forward to as CEO of the EWGA?

    I am looking forward the challenge to continue to grow the women’s game. It’s where I spent most of my life, so I am very much looking forward to giving back by creating awareness and opportunities for women that play the game and for those who will play in the future.

 
 

Celebrate National Golf Day on Capitol Hill

National Golf Day celebrates the economic impact of golf in the United States

WE ARE GOLF, a coalition of the game's leading associations and industry partners, returns to Capitol Hill for the 10th annual National Golf Day tomorrow, Wednesday, April 26.  During the day, leaders from many associations representing the golf industry meet with Members of Congress to discuss the game’s tax benefits to local communities and ask for equal treatment as a legitimate industry. 

The national economic impact from the game is nearly $70 billion, with a $4 billion annual charitable impact along with providing both environmental and fitness benefits.  Industry leaders continue to report on golf’s 15,204 facilities in the U.S., with more than 10,000 facilities open to the public.  One in 75 U.S. jobs is impacted by the golf industry, accounting for $55.6 billion wage income from about two million U.S. jobs.  While the public believes the cost to play golf is expensive, WE ARE GOLF reports the median green fee in the U.S. is $37 and eight out of 10 golfers play at public golf facilities.   

New for 2017, golf industry leaders will participate in a community service initiative on the national Mall to focus on the beautification, preservation and helping the National park Service with turf-deferred maintenance.

In 2016, National Golf Day was the most successful event to date, with members attending more than 120 scheduled Congressional meetings in one day.  WE ARE GOLF encourages golfers to participate in the annual social media campaign to help create awareness and spread the good news about golf.  Last year the #NGD16 Twitter campaign had 52 million impressions and reached 17.7 million accounts, with 4.4 million users in a one-hour span.

Golfers are encouraged to join the conversation by visiting the social media hub for suggested Tweets and social media posts.  Use #NGD17 and tag @wearegolf for Twitter and Instagram to show your support for the golf industry.