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How to Break 80

Breaking 80The past two weeks we’ve talked about how a sharp short game can help you break 100 and practicing your 100-yard shot and in can help you break 90.  So if you score regularly in 80s, what can you do with your golf game to help you break 80? 

Chances are you are chasing that single-digit handicap goal and would like to break 80 on a regular basis.  You have practiced and perfected your short game and hit greens in regulation (all tips to break 100 and 90).  Now it’s time to dial in all your clubs – including your driver – so you are consistent and give yourself scoring chances.

The first thing to do is to know how far you hit and carry distance for each club.  You can easily accomplish this through a club fitting or lesson from a PGA or LPGA Professional who can help you determine how far the ball goes with each club.  Many club fitters and golf professional use Trackman, a launch monitor device that measures trajectory and distance.  If that’s not available, use a GPS or laser range finder to determine your distances.  If you find two clubs go the same distance, ask your club fitter or Professional to test the loft to make sure they aren’t the same – this can sometimes happen when the clubs are made – so make sure each club is a different loft.  As we discussed last week, generally the loft difference between your irons should be 4° which will give you 10 yards of difference between clubs. 

Also have your driver checked to make sure it’s best suited for your swing.  Many people use higher lofts on drivers (10° to 12°) to maximize the loft and roll to get additional distance.  While most people taking golf lessons always want more distance, it’s better to be accurate from the tee to keep your ball in play and avoid trouble.  That allows you to have a swing for your approach shot rather than trying to get yourself back into play from an adjacent fairway or rough.

Knowing your iron distances and controlling your driver will help you play smarter and manage the course better, which equals lower scores, hopefully in the 70s.