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How to Break 90

How to Break the 90 Golf Barrier

Are you stuck in the 90s?  Meaning you consistently break 100 but can’t seem to get into the 80’s.  Last week we talked about focusing on practicing the short game – so chances are you are good at chipping, pitching and putting but can’t seem to crack the 90 barrier. 

Just as in committing to practice your short game, the same holds true for trying to score in the 80s on a regular basis.  You need to commit time to practicing – which may include a series of lessons with a PGA or LPGA Professional who will assist you in accomplishing your goals. 

An easy way to determine what part of your game needs work is to simply keep track of the number of greens you hit in regulation.  Chances are you hit less than half the greens in regulation, which causes you to take an extra shot around the green – thus turning your par into bogey or your bogey into a double bogey.  

The best way to overcome missing greens is to figure out your 100-yard club and practice enough to really be consistent with that club.  The general rule of thumb is each club should have four degrees of loft difference which equates to 10 yards.  So if your 7-iron is your 100-yard club, you should hit your 8-iron 90 yards and a 9-iron 80 yards, etc.  (The loft of the 7 iron should be about 34°, the 8 iron 37° and the 9 iron 41° so each four degrees of loft equals 10 yards).  Also get a feel for your distance with a pitching wedge, sand wedge and lob wedge (depending on how many wedges you carry).  Then as you get closer to the green, determine which clubs travel 30 to 50-yards if you use a half-swing. 

Feeling comfortable with your mid to short irons will help you reach greens in regulation and cut down on multiple approach shots from missing the green.  Many golfers miss the green because they don’t take enough club, so by practicing from 100-yards and in, you will know which club to use to hit more greens and be on your way to posting some scores in the 80s.