ConnectingWomen

 

Manage Your Game By What You Measure

Golf Scorecard and Pencil

We’ve all heard the best way to lower your score is to practice your short game – where you can save valuable strokes by chipping the ball close to the hole or by avoiding the dreaded three-putt.  Yet another way to improve your golf game and lower your score is to keep track of your stats.

Studies show the best way to make a difference in your score is to hit greens in regulation (GIR), however, due to the length of most golf courses, this is a tough feat for many women.  Greens in regulation for women don’t have to be the same as men…so maybe your personal goal is to reach the green in three shots on a par 4 vs. two shots.  Keep track on your scorecard how many strokes it takes you to reach the green and look for a pattern (or consistent number of shots to reach the green).  If you feel like you are always hitting a chip shot to the green, you could take one more club to try to reach the green and not end up chipping on, if your previous shot was short of the green. 

Another important stat to record on your score card is the number of putts.  Many golfers keep track of putts for little side-bet games but pay close attention to your putting stats.  You should try to finish an 18-hole round with fewer than 36 putts.  If you are in the 37-40 range on a regular basis, take time to practice your putting and get rid of the three-putts.  Golf Digest reports that a typical golfer who shoots 95, averages 37 putts a round while a typical Professional who shoots 71, averages 29 putts.  To break 90, you need to have 34 putts per round and to break 80, get to 31 or 32 putts per round.

If you think about it, greens in regulation and putts account for most golfers ups and downs in their game.  If you struggle getting from the tee to the green, great putting can help you immensely. 

An easy way to track your stats on your scorecard is to circle the hole number on the scorecard when you hit a green in regulation.  Another way is to make an X in the box below your score when you hit a GIR.  Simply add up the circles or X’s to determine how many greens you hit.  Increase that GIR goal each time you play and watch how the results track over your four or five next rounds.  For putting, since your goal is two putts per green, I like to record only one-putts or three-putts (no sense writing all those 2’s on the card).  Total your putts after each round and see how GIR and putting help lower your score.

You can track and record any number of other shots as well.  Some people like to track hitting fairways with their tee shot.  Assuming there are four par 3’s during the round, you can track how many fairways you hit out of a possible 14 tee shots.  Also keep track of the par 3’s you hit in regulation and try to score 3’s and 4’s on every par 3. 

When you finish a round, you can create a spreadsheet to record the stats from each round.  Keeping track of your stats is the best way to see what areas of your game need more concentration and practice.  By tracking your stats, you can note your progress to an improved game and lower scores.